Documenting Legal Information Through Legal Transcription

In the world of transcribing, there may be none as important as the legal transcriptionist. Not only are they charged with the responsibility to record legal interviews for hearings, motions, pleadings, depositions, legal argument, and judgments, there are countless other topics that these transcribers must document accurately, efficiently, and without any pause.

The major reason that legal transcription is so important is because it can be used as evidence in an important case. Not only that, it can also be used for future reference for possible repeat offenders in some instances. These transcriptionists will sit for hours on end, documenting each word that is said between legal parties. While in some cases, it may be done through a recording of the legal movement; it is often times done live and without any ability to pause in typing.

Unlike other forms of transcription, legal transcriptionists often times will type on specialized transcription equipment, rather than on a computer. The major reason for this is because if the power goes out, or if there is a technical error during a court hearing, there is no way for the transcriptionist to get back any lost files, which may have actually sent a criminal to their rightful place.

While there are many freelance transcription jobs out there, legal transcription is not one of them. Legal transcription often times requires years of college education, but why? Well, with something so important on the line, there is no room for a rookie error. Typically, these people are hired after schooling and years of transcription work under their belts. However, it is possible to get them fresh out of college as well if you show potential in accuracy and speed.

If the court or company that is needing legal transcription doesn’t have an in-house transcriptionist, they will often times hire from one of the many different transcription companies housed in each state and country in the world. This is mostly because if they hire in, they do not need to pay an hourly or salaried employee when there is no work to be done in transcribing.

On the flip side of the coin, if you’re a hiring law firm or someone else who may need legal transcribing? It is quite easy to find a legal transcriptionist these days with the invention of the Internet. It seems they are a dime a dozen when you know just how and where to look.

Of course as with anything else that is for sale, whether it be time, goods, or transcribing, the prices will vary from place to place. However, just because it is affordable, won’t mean it is bad. Just like if it is extraordinarily expensive, will it be good. The most important thing to do is to look for the credentials of both the individual who will be performing the legal transcribing and the company, which employs them. Remember; protect yourself from scams, even a company with good standing in the legal world can get scammed online. Know the company that you are hiring for legal transcription!

Clarifying Legal Information With Public Divorce Records

The importance of divorce records within our civil system cannot be overstated. Together with Marriage, Birth and Death, this category of records form the Vital Records group within the Public Records Offices of the respective State Departments across the nation. Conventionally, the Office of Vital Records also functions as the State repository and some of their archives hold divorce files from as early as the 1800’s. Originating county and district offices and courts generally go even further back.

Divorce decrees are a mainstay of public information these days. In line with the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act in 1966, this public amenity became mandatory and have remained such ever since. Although there are variations in laws among the various state jurisdictions governing their accessibility today, public divorce records are essentially public information throughout the country. That means any member of the public anywhere in the land will ultimately have access to them although some states are restrictive in granting their release.

Public Records come under State jurisdiction. For states which are less liberal with public divorce records, only the individuals whose names are on the records, their legal representatives and direct family members are eligible to request them. This is because of the nature of such records which inherently contain private and vital information. Under such jurisdictions, clarifying vital information with Public Divorce Records by other parties is only possible with a court order, police warrant and other official authorization or when the records are older than a certain number of years, usually 50.

Generally, the designated state central agency responsible for responding to requests from the public will issue Public Divorce Records or their copies as long as procedures are followed and requirements are met. The charges for them are usually nominal – around $13.00 per copy paid directly to the Vital Records office which is effectively more of an administrative fee rather than the cost of the records itself. County-level searches may be more suitable for some folks due to location or other technical reasons. The records at these individual agencies would be similar to those at the central repository as they are inherently the point of origin of the corresponding data there in the first place.

There are typically a number of options to request Public Divorce Records from government offices in most states namely walk-in, mail, telephone and fax. Of late, online applications are increasingly being offered also, affording a much faster retrieval process with great convenience for those whose time and bandwidth are of the essence. What’s even better is the rapid emergence of private commercial records providers on the Internet. The market is competitive so the industry standards are remarkably high and fees are very affordable. That’s why savvy folks looking to advance their romantic relationship nowadays are clarifying vital information with Public Divorce Records.

Legal Information About the Real Estate Contract

The conclusion of final agreement between a seller and a buyer is the Agreement of Purchase and Sale. We know it as the real estate contract.

There are five mandatory requirements for a contract under contract law:

1. The name, address and contact data for the seller(s) and buyer(s).

2. A clear description of the property. We prefer the tax map and parcel number but a street address, or other clear description will do. Such as “parcel known as Hudson Farm, being 456 acres more or less fronting on west side of US Route One and County Rd. 264, being about 9 miles north of Rehoboth in Sussex County Delaware. The final description on the deed at settlement will contain the Book and Page number where it was purchased, a survey description and tax map ID. For the contract any clear description that could ONLY be the property being sold is sufficient. This can be the Tax I.D. number.

3. The price and terms of payment. For instance: cash at settlement in thirty days from the date of this contract. Here should also be noted the deposit or consideration which may be as little as one dollar BUT is normally 10% of the purchase price.

4. The date of the contract.

5. Signatures of all sellers and buyers.

Although the contract need not be written on the form provided by the Realtor, it is customary to do so. On larger properties a simple note is often written which include the above 5 items and says that a full contract will follow. Then, the short contract is followed by another formalized contract drawn up by the attorney for the buyer or the seller. That is then reviewed and usually changed to some degree by the attorneys for the other side of the transaction.

On larger and more complicated properties the contract can go to dozens or even hundreds of pages. The five items here must be included but hundreds or thousands of other items may need to be included for some properties.

Most contracts today, for residential homes, are written on the standard contract form authorized by the County Board of Realtors and provided by the purchaser’s Realtor. The deposit money, or earnest money as it is sometimes called, is usually deposited in the escrow account of the selling Realtor.

Until all of the items above are included and ratified by all parties there is not a contract but only a “contract in progress” or an “offer” as we call it. This can be an offer to sell or an offer to buy and there may be several counter offers going back and forth as negotiations continue.

When everything is finalized the fully written and agreed upon document is said to be ratified. Even then the contract is not fully enforceable until it is conveyed, and received, in writing to all parties. THEN and only then can it be said to be a full and complete and enforcable contract.

Copyright © 2001-2005 www.JodyHudson.com

Asbestos Mesothelioma Legal Information and You?

Facts you need to know regarding asbestos mesothelioma legal information? Asbestos is classified as a naturally sourced mineral. It’s been utilised for many years for assorted reasons such as in building components, small appliances, insulating materials and vehicle components. It’s used in shipyards, manufacturing plants, railroads, industrial facilities as well as in other places. It is known as extremely resistant against deterioration and is a great insulator next to high temperature.

However, asbestos has some properties that make it harmful to any person handling it. It has been known to cause of various cancers, such as lung cancer and mesothelioma. The latter is a rare form of cancer, also known as asbestos cancer. The mesothelium is the lining of some cavities and organs. The mesothelia most affected by exposure to asbestos are those of the heart, lungs and intestines.

According to statistics, Mesothelioma kills about 3000 people annually. This kills 3% to 5% more males than ladies. This is mainly because men constitute a larger portion of the workforce than women. This cancer also has a latency period. It takes a long time to develop, sometimes even decades.

Individuals with Mesothelioma have numerous legitimate options to obtain settlement. Affected persons are encouraged to file lawsuits for compensation. There are two types of asbestos cancer lawsuits: personal injury and wrongful death. In the former, a person with mesothelioma cancer files a claim for damages, ranging from loss of wages, past and present medical expenses and pain and suffering. In the latter, survivors of a deceased victim of this cancer may file a wrongful death claim, for the premature death of their kin. The claim covers earnings, companionship, protection as well as treatment providers. In the US, regulations pertaining to these lawsuits differ from one state to another.

For many years, companies that used asbestos never educated their employees on the risks of dealing with this well-known carcinogen. Consequently, many employees contracted diseases due to overexposure, while companies got away with their negligent behavior. Today, however, things are different. Persons that worked in such companies can now file lawsuits seeking compensation, even though they no longer work there anymore. Compensations from such claims are large enough for the patient and their family as well.

In addition, the US government protects people with disabilities. Patients suffering from Mesothelioma cancer are eligible for disability compensation. They are able to secure compensation by submitting a social security disability lawsuit claim, seeking financial help. They may also pursue a similar disability claim privately with an insurance company, through their employer’s insurance policy, or an existing life insurance policy. In some instances, health insurance should provide monetary compensation to help offset some of their medical costs. In the event the insurance company declines to do so, one may file a lawsuit for unmerited insurance practice.

It is advisable to seek the services of a lawyer for asbestos mesothelioma legal information who is well acquainted with similar lawsuits and who is able to work around the legal intricacies of such cases. Victims of this disease no longer need to suffer unnecessarily as there are many legal options available to them now.

Copyright (c) 2010 Daniel K Voyles

3 Tips on Picking a Good Lawyer: Free Legal Information

Sooner or later, you may need a lawyer to defend you. It’s easy to think that all you need to do is, go to a law firm, hire a lawyer and let him/her represent you. But it’s certainly not that simple always! Lawyers are numerous, yet picking a good lawyer only constitutes to a small number. Compound this complication with the verity that the success of your case will greatly rely on how well you choose your legal representative. So, if you’re faced with this very daunting task, you have to specifically know who you’re really looking for.

You have to understand first that you’re looking for someone with whom you can frankly discuss the legal aspects of your case. You’re not looking for a friend, companion or a shoulder to cry on. You’re aiming to have a lawyer. Therefore, do not expect personal advices and treatment to come from your lawyer. Everything is limited to business and professional relationship alone.

Now in picking a good lawyer, you must look for specific qualities and specialties. If you have marital issues and are planning to ending your relationship, a divorce attorney would be suitable for your case. If you have real estate problems, an intellectual property lawyer would be of great help. And if you have a criminal case, then you must definitely opt for a criminal defense lawyer. Know your lawyer’s specialty and it will be easier for you to narrow down your choices.

Another great consideration is in terms of payment. Choosing a good lawyer would mean a hefty professional fee. Keep in mind that lawyers are paid on an hourly basis especially those handling criminal cases and those doing a regular legal work for you. However, if you don’t have funds for these kinds of lawyers, you can always go for public defenders. Their availability may be limited, but you can still make the most out of these defenders without shedding a hefty price.

Finally, picking a good lawyer is possible by doing your own research. You can ask people you know who have been on a similar situation as yours. This way, it will be easier to find a good lawyer, and at the same time, ask more information about that specific lawyer. Also, you can be assured that you’ll be dealing with a good one as referred to you by a colleague or a person close to you.